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The JAMA Network

Approximately 44% of homeless adults are hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected. Historically, homeless and marginally housed (HMH) adults have faced barriers to HCV treatment. New, interferon-free therapies have excellent cure rates and improved tolerability, reducing barriers for treatment.  To our knowledge, no published studies have documented the treatment of HMH populations with these therapies.The Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) began treating HMH adults with oral agents in 2014.

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CBS Evening News

Dr. Jim O’Connell went to Harvard Medical School at the age of 30. After finishing his residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, he was on his way to an oncology fellowship when the city of Boston received a grant, along with 18 other cities, to improve their health care system for the homeless.

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CBS Evening News

BOSTON -- It’s Friday morning in Boston, which means Dr. Jim O’Connell is making his rounds.  

He might be a little more comfortable inside a warm exam room, but that’s not where his patients are. O’Connell is Boston’s only doctor left still making house calls to the homeless.

Nearly 600,000 Americans are homeless, and many have health problems with no access to care. O’Connell and his nationally renowned team of “street doctors” are doing something about it, treating about 700 regular patients.

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Spare Change News

The first Winter Walk took place Sunday, Feb. 12 seeking to address the needs of Boston’s homeless community and share the real stories and struggles of this population.

As we trudge through the coldest month of the year, thankful for many luxuries we deem standard commodities, our city’s homeless individuals are faced with the terrible reality of New England’s harsh winter weather.

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The Heights
After Jim O’Connell finished Harvard Medical School and completed a residency at Mass General Hospital, he spent two months washing people’s feet.

On Thursday night, O’Connell, founding physician and current president of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), gave a lecture as part of the Park Street Corporation Speaker Series on his experiences as a health care provider to Boston’s homeless population.

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Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

For a homeless person who’s cold or hungry or intoxicated, the emergency room is often the first place they’ll think to go to find warmth, a sandwich, or a place to spend the night.

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NEJM Journal Watch

I met Jon Harris, PA-C, during his days as a PA student at Northeastern University and was immediately impressed. He excelled in my course, and I knew that he was destined to be an impactful clinician. He previously had graduated from Columbia University with a degree in environmental sciences and spent several years working in the nonprofit, nonmedical community. On a friend’s advice, he started volunteering as an EMT in rural Vermont and quickly found a love for medicine.

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Jennifer Brody
The Kraft Center for Community Health
Jennifer Brody, MD, MPH, Kraft Practitioner alumna (Class of 2014), Internal Medicine physician and Director of HIV Services at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), recently completed an interview with the Kraft Center, offering insight into her reasons for practicing in community health, a summary of the Kraft program's impact on her own career, and updates from her post-Kraft experience.
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The JAMA Network

Addressing the medical issues of homeless people is the health equity challenge of our time. The most recent US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) report on homelessness, published in 2015, estimated that about 564 000 homeless people in the United States live in shelters and on the streets. This figure, based on a point-in-time snapshot on a single night each January, may well be an underestimate, given varying definitions of homelessness, peripatetic populations, and the lack of robust surveillance systems.

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Spare Change News

 

Diamond O’Connell spent 15 years without a home, but in the time she spent homeless, she gained a family.  The other people she met living on the Boston streets became her brothers and sisters, a family she would never stop supporting, evenas some of their names were read aloud Wednesday at the 27th Annual Interfaith Homeless Memorial Service. The 92 names read by various faith leaders in the community were homeless men and women who had died in the past year.

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