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WBUR

They arrive on their own, worried about what was really in that bag of heroin. Some are carried in, slumped between two friends. Others are lifted off the sidewalk or asphalt of a nearby alley and rolled in a wheelchair to what's known as SPOT, or the Supportive Place for Observation and Treatment, at the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP).

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WBUR

In this Kind World story, Cheryl Kane, a nurse with the Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Program, recalls an unforeseen moment with Max that continues to inform her nursing practice, years later.

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Eagle Tribune

Dr. Howard K. Koh of Andover, professor of the practice of public health leadership and director of the Leading Change Studio at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is being honored by the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program for his work with the homeless.

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The Boston Globe

The headquarters of Boston Health Care for the Homeless, a 30-year-old program dedicated to the city’s most vulnerable patients, occupies part of the building next to Woods-Mullen.

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Medium

Dr. Jim O’Connell is one cool dude.

He’s a professor at Harvard Med and Mass General, president of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), and he’s spent more than three decades treating homeless patients.

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The Boston Globe

Warren Magee, 46, is one of the new residents of Francis Grady Apartments, a 30-unit development for the formerly homeless that recently opened in Jamaica Plain. An adjacent development, the 20-bed Stacy Kirkpatrick House, will provide short-term health care for homeless patients, helping to address a chronic need.

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The Boston Globe

Almost a quarter of the patients we care for at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program are living with hepatitis C, a disease that contributes greatly to health care utilization and cost. We’ve worked hard to increase access to the lifesaving treatments the Globe reported on this month, and our early outcomes have been overwhelmingly successful.

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The Boston Globe

The argument against using drugs like methadone and Suboxone to kick heroin usually gets whittled to a cliched, and inaccurate, phrase: It’s trading one addiction for another. But ask Dr. Jessie Gaeta about some of the clients she treats in the heart of Boston’s so-called Methadone Mile and she’ll describe regimens that are about trading despair for hope

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The Boston Globe logo
The Boston Globe

Four people will die today from an opioid overdose in Massachusetts. Tomorrow, if the average from 2015 remains unchanged, another four souls — who may at this very moment be reading this article — will also lose their lives with the push of a plunger.

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Wicked Local

You can’t keep a good cyclist down. After being forced to the sidelines last year, Medford resident Stacy Kirkpatrick made a much-anticipated return to the road for the 35th annual Pan-Massachusetts Challenge, Aug. 1-2.

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Spare Change News

Dr. Avik Chatterjee, a doctor trained in internal medicine and pediatrics, has been taking care of homeless patients out of a medical van as part of an outreach program at Boston Health Care for the Homeless for the past three years.

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NECN - DC Dialogue

Jim O'Connell, president of Boston Healthcare for the Homeless, explains how his organization brings medical care to the city's homeless people and the severity of the drug epidemic in that demographic.

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The Boston Globe

It has become a grim workplace routine: the “code blue” crackling over the loudspeaker. The all-hands-on-deck emergency response. Then, in more than half the calls, the discovery of a nonresponsive person — blue lips, shallow breathing, and constricted pupils, all telltale signs of a drug overdose.

“It’s happening everywhere,” said Dr. Jessie Gaeta, chief medical officer at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, headquartered in the South End neighborhood infamously nicknamed Methadone Mile.

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Health Affairs Blog

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more people died from drug overdoses in 2014 than in any year on record. Most of these deaths—78 every day—involved an opioid. Closer to home in Boston, deaths from opioid overdoses increased by 50 percent from 2014 to 2015 (Note 1). In our practice, Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), based on the corner of Massachusetts Avenue and Albany Street (the epicenter of Boston’s drug activity), opioid overdoses have become the leading cause of death among our patients.

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WBUR Radio Boston

The man known as “Boston’s doctor to the homeless” has spent 30 years offering hot coffee, warm blankets and medical care to souls left on the streets.

Now, Dr. Jim O’Connell, co-founder and president of Boston Health Care for the Homeless, has written a book of essays about his experiences, Stories from the Shadows.

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The Boston Globe

A second homeless person in Boston has died from a potent bacterial infection, and another person was stricken with the same illness in recent weeks, prompting city health officials to indefinitely extend a vaccination campaign.

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Spare Change News

Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program partnered with the Red Sox Foundation to collect 5,100 pairs of socks and $2,100 in their Sox for Socks charity drive at Fenway on June 3-5. BHCHP hands out clean socks to homeless patients in their 60 locations and on the street.

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The Boston Globe

To those who live on the streets, Stacy Kirkpatrick was more than just a nurse practitioner at Boston Health Care for the Homeless — more than a caregiver who brought her healing presence to shelters. “She was my family,” said Larry Adams, who was her patient for many years.

“I was homeless and I was an addict. I was all messed up. I’m the kind of person, I don’t trust nobody,” said Adams, who helped found and chaired the health care agency’s Consumer Advisory Board. He put his faith in Ms. Kirkpatrick, however. “Her word was gospel. Whatever she said, I did. As a matter of fact, the reason I’m here is she saved my life.”

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Boston Globe

In the summer of 1985, two days after finishing his residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, Dr. James J. O’Connell entered the Nurses’ Clinic at Pine Street Inn for his first day of work. As he tells the story in his new book, Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor, his swagger drew a “stern grimace” from Barbara McInnis and the other nurses.

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Harvard Magazine

Joe Meuse spent years drunk on the streets of Boston, sleeping under bridges, over grates, in train stations and tunnels—wherever he passed out. Occasionally he agreed to be driven to a shelter. Meuse was told he logged an astonishing 216 hospital emergency room visits in 18 months, but he doesn’t remember any of them.

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