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One of the earliest electronic health record (EHR) systems was designed for the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program in 1994 by engineers at Massachusetts General Hospital’s Laboratory of Computer Science. Before such systems were widely available, this one allowed multiple providers caring for the homeless — in one case, as many as 50 unique providers — to access a single patient’s record.

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The Boston Globe

The $10 million-plus complex, funded by a mix of city and state affordable housing funds, is a joint project of Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program and the nonprofit Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Corp.

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The Boston Globe

Four years ago, when she was a freshman at Boston University, Sarah Kapica would avert her eyes as she walked past the man who sat, wrapped in a blanket, in the doorway of an abandoned apartment building in Kenmore Square.

She had grown up in a nice family in a nice house in a nice suburb, and the scruffy homeless man made her uncomfortable.

But something changed her sophomore year. Something gnawed at her as she crossed the intersection at Beacon Street and Commonwealth Avenue, pushing her inexorably toward the sunken man huddled in the doorway.

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Boston Globe

With temperatures expected to plummet below zero this week, city officials and homeless advocates are racing to find more space to house the surge of people sleeping on the streets since the city’s largest shelter on Long Island closed last fall.

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WBUR

While Boston continues to deal with mountains of snow and extreme cold, the city is also grappling with an even larger than usual number of homeless people.

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North End Post Gazette

Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) recently honored Howard K. Koh, MD, professor of the practice of public health leadership and director of the Leading Change Stuio at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health with it's Dr. Jim O'Connell Award.

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WBUR - Common Health

A room with a nurse, some soft chairs and basic life-saving equipment. Together, this is the latest tool a group of local doctors and nurses plans to create to fight the state’s opiate epidemic. Though it doesn’t have all the funding yet, Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program  (BHCHP) plans to open the so-called “safe space,” where heroin users could ride out a high under medical supervision, at the beginning of next year at the corner of Mass. Ave and Albany Street.

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Mass Live

Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program hopes to open a "safe space" for intravenous drug users, one they say can help prevent overdoses.

The room would feature reclining chairs, medical professionals on hand to check vitals and life-saving equipment if a drug user overdoses.

“[It would be] a place where people would come if they’re high and they need a safe place to be that’s not a street corner or not a bathroom by themselves, where they’re at high risk of dying if they do overdose," Dr. Jessie Gaeta, the BHCHP chief medical officer, told WBUR.

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WBUR

As Boston officials rush to create shelter space for some of the 700 homeless people who were displaced when the only bridge to Long Island was closed, 100 new beds are scheduled to become available Tuesday.

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Boston Globe

As a young man, the doctor made a promise. He would do this kind of work for one year. It was, he believed, all anyone could stand.

Practicing medicine on the street is too taxing. It pushes its practitioners to the edge of their physical and emotional limits. One year, he told himself, and then it’s time for oncology.

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The Boston Globe

Disease-trackers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention arrived in Boston Wednesday to study the spread of a deadly bacterial infection among homeless people.

Dr. Anita Barry, director of the Infectious Disease Bureau at the Boston Public Health Commission, said the CDC is interested in the city’s experience because the federal agency is updating guidelines for handling clusters of meningococcal disease, the infection that killed two homeless people in Boston and sickened three others.

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The Daily Free Press

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began to investigate and research an outbreak of fatal bacterial infections among the City of Boston’s homeless population Wednesday, according to Marjorie Nesin, spokesperson for the Boston Public Health Commission.

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Yahoo News

Since the 1600s, Boston has been the unofficial capital of New England — and, at times, the nation. Now healthcare advocates for the homeless believe it's time for the City on a Hill to lead the way in combatting a new scourge making alarming inroads in even small-town America: opiate addiction.

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WGBH

Dr. Jim O’Connell has been providing medical attention to homeless people around Boston for the last 30 years. Dr. O’Connell was on Boston Public Radio Tuesday to discuss his new book, Stories From the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor.

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Crux

Thanksgiving season is the time of year when many of us pitch in to help the homeless.

Dr. Jim O’Connell and his team of doctors and nurses will still be helping them next week and the week after that.

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The New York Times

In Boston, where pedestrians step over drug users who are nodding off on a stretch of Massachusetts Avenue known as Methadone Mile, an organization for the homeless has planned what it calls a safe space, where users could ride out their high under supervision; it would not allow actual injection on site.

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Jamaica Plain Gazette

JP resident Mala Rafik joins with Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program CEO Barry Bock and Needham resident Doug Brooks at the BHCHP’s “Medicine that Matters” fundraising gala at the Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel May 6.

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Boston Herald

Construction of a $14 million affordable housing and medical care facility for homeless people is expected to be completed late this year in Jamaica Plain and reach full occupancy early next year.

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Boston Globe

It’s a long way from his practice at Massachusetts General Hospital, where Gonzalez sees more well-heeled patients. The homeless sometimes can’t, sometimes won’t get to mainstream hospitals, so for nearly two decades, Gonzalez, 76, has taken his black bag to them at the Barbara McInnis House on Albany Street, where Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) runs a treatment center.

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NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross

As a doctor who provides medical care to Boston's homeless population, James O'Connell and his colleagues are used to working in unusual locations. "We are basically visiting them in their homes, which are often under bridges, down back alleyways [and] on park benches," O'Connell tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "It's been an education for us over these years."

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