WBUR

In this Kind World story, Cheryl Kane, a nurse with the Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Program, recalls an unforeseen moment with Max that continues to inform her nursing practice, years later.

Read More
Santa Barbara Independent

A few weeks after a 600-person army of volunteers scoured Santa Barbara County to tally the homeless population and assess their needs, a lecture hall packed with UCSB students heard from two out-of-town doctors about the importance of “street medicine” in providing care to the indigent.

Read More
WBUR

While Boston continues to deal with mountains of snow and extreme cold, the city is also grappling with an even larger than usual number of homeless people.

Read More
Wicked Local

Dr. Virginia Barrow of Winchester has found her true calling.

Since 2011, Barrow, known as Ginger, has been providing medical health care for homeless patients in downtown Boston as a physician on staff at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program.

Read More
WBUR

As Boston officials rush to create shelter space for some of the 700 homeless people who were displaced when the only bridge to Long Island was closed, 100 new beds are scheduled to become available Tuesday.

Read More
Boston Globe

With temperatures expected to plummet below zero this week, city officials and homeless advocates are racing to find more space to house the surge of people sleeping on the streets since the city’s largest shelter on Long Island closed last fall.

Read More
Wicked Local

Every Monday afternoon from 1 to 3, you’ll find Waltham resident Richard Daggett doing something rather unusual: tending to the feet of homeless people.

Daggett, a 76-year-old retired hospital executive, is a volunteer with Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), a nonprofit delivering healthcare to more than 12,000 homeless men, women and children a year at 70 shelters and other sites.

Read More

“My husband died after 14 years on dialysis. My life fell apart and I ended up living under a bridge in Kenmore Square. Living outside is horrible. It's hard to break the cycle once you're in the streets. You're dirty. There are no showers, no clothes or food. Your spirit gets very damaged just trying to survive."

Read More

We had cared for Dennis for years; in his cardboard box under a loading dock at the Wise Potato Chip factory in South Boston, in the hospital, in Barbara McInnis House and finally in housing. Dennis struggled with mental illness and alcoholism. He suffered the usual ravages of the street: frostbite, fractures, and a very deep sense of worthlessness. His life was filled with pain.

Read More

Pages

Subscribe to Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program RSS