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N Magazine

The inspiring Dr. Jim O’Connell.

In the summer of 2005, Jack Welch leaned over and whispered something to Dr. Cary Akins that made the cardiologist’s heart skip a beat. “I want to donate a million dollars to a charity of your choice,” the former chairman of General Electric said. The two Nantucket summer residents were sitting at a table at Topper’s, but only few months earlier, Welch was lying on Akins’s operating table undergoing bypass surgery. He now wanted to thank the doctor for saving his life by making a million-dollar donation in his honor. “Let me give it some thought,” Akins said.

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College of the Holy Cross

I am deeply grateful and humbled by this invitation to address you today. I cannot tell you how proud and astonished we were when Fr. Boroughs came and visited us in Boston at our main clinic and respite care program back in January. We have lived in relatively blissful obscurity for many years, and it was the first time we had a distinguished college president come to visit.  So we thought we had arrived.

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Crisis Spurring Creativity in Dealing with Opiate Addiction
NBC Boston

Chad Barboza grasped the bar, looked upward, and lifted the weights onto his shoulders. 

On May 16, Barboza worked out in the CrossFit training session at Phoenix Multisport in Roxbury, a nonprofit open to people who have been sober for at least 48 hours, to work out. 

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The JAMA Network

Approximately 44% of homeless adults are hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected. Historically, homeless and marginally housed (HMH) adults have faced barriers to HCV treatment. New, interferon-free therapies have excellent cure rates and improved tolerability, reducing barriers for treatment.  To our knowledge, no published studies have documented the treatment of HMH populations with these therapies.The Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) began treating HMH adults with oral agents in 2014.

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CBS Evening News

Dr. Jim O’Connell went to Harvard Medical School at the age of 30. After finishing his residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, he was on his way to an oncology fellowship when the city of Boston received a grant, along with 18 other cities, to improve their health care system for the homeless.

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CBS Evening News

BOSTON -- It’s Friday morning in Boston, which means Dr. Jim O’Connell is making his rounds.  

He might be a little more comfortable inside a warm exam room, but that’s not where his patients are. O’Connell is Boston’s only doctor left still making house calls to the homeless.

Nearly 600,000 Americans are homeless, and many have health problems with no access to care. O’Connell and his nationally renowned team of “street doctors” are doing something about it, treating about 700 regular patients.

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Spare Change News

The first Winter Walk took place Sunday, Feb. 12 seeking to address the needs of Boston’s homeless community and share the real stories and struggles of this population.

As we trudge through the coldest month of the year, thankful for many luxuries we deem standard commodities, our city’s homeless individuals are faced with the terrible reality of New England’s harsh winter weather.

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The Heights
After Jim O’Connell finished Harvard Medical School and completed a residency at Mass General Hospital, he spent two months washing people’s feet.

On Thursday night, O’Connell, founding physician and current president of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), gave a lecture as part of the Park Street Corporation Speaker Series on his experiences as a health care provider to Boston’s homeless population.

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Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

For a homeless person who’s cold or hungry or intoxicated, the emergency room is often the first place they’ll think to go to find warmth, a sandwich, or a place to spend the night.

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NEJM Journal Watch

I met Jon Harris, PA-C, during his days as a PA student at Northeastern University and was immediately impressed. He excelled in my course, and I knew that he was destined to be an impactful clinician. He previously had graduated from Columbia University with a degree in environmental sciences and spent several years working in the nonprofit, nonmedical community. On a friend’s advice, he started volunteering as an EMT in rural Vermont and quickly found a love for medicine.

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